All posts tagged: gastronomie

8 mars – 20 steps to perfect crêpes

Crêpes are known as French pancakes, but they’re really so much more than that. They can be eaten with sweet jams, nutella, or syrups or with savory cheese, meats, veggies and even eggs. I recently perfected my own method to make perfect dinner or dessert-ready crêpes, and you can follow along with my instructions below! Google search “easy crêpe recipe“ Realize that all of these American food blogs and recipe sites have their measurments in cups and tablespoons and you live in a country that measures things in liters and grams. Google search “recette crêpes facile“ Open up the first 3 or 4 links to compare methods and ingredients. Eliminate any that include ingredients you don’t have, like Grand Marnier or rum. They’re clearly too complicated for a weeknight. Your randomly chosen recipes call for a differing number of eggs: some say 2, others 6…so split the difference and crack 3 into a large bowl. Whisk. You’ll need approximately 250g of flour, but of course you have no way to measure that. Google “how many tablespoons is …

croziflette

If you are dreaming of ways to add more carbs to your life, then I definitely have the recipe for you!! Tartiflette is a dish famous across France, but originates in the mountainous Alpine region of Savoie, where I lived. It’s the perfect dish to warm you up after a long day of hitting the ski slopes, or to clog up your arteries in a delicious whirlwind of potato, cream, cheese, and bacon. Really that describes all of the famous dishes from the region, which also include raclette and fondue. But my personal favorite version of tartiflette is a variation called croziflette, which substitutes the potatoes for a specialty made in Savoie, called the crozet. Crozets are tiny square tiles usually made with buckwheat flour. I like to think of croziflette as Alpine mac & cheese. This dish became our go-to for weekend get togethers, and always served up a week of creamy delicious lunch leftovers! Being Americans from the country famous for its casseroles, my friends and I often modified our croziflette to include broccoli or …

Five Things to Do With Your Free Time Instead of Travelling

A few weeks ago, a fellow TAPIF assistant and blogger, Anne à l’aventure, published a post about reasons NOT to travel, which got me thinking… It may not be a popular opinion, especially in the Instagram Age where #wanderlust is the most noble of ambitions, but I am increasingly coming to terms with the notion that I’m simply not cut out for the “traveller lifestyle.” One look around my bedroom will tell you why: I have only lived here six months and already my walls are covered in postcards, train tickets and children’s drawings. Dozens of books are stacked on the floor next to the slowly growing pile of flashcards and worksheets used at school. Markers, pens, post-it notes and girl scout cookies clutter my desk and my window sill is home to not one but two plants. This is not the kind of place that you can easily pack into a backpack.

I Heart Chambery: anniversary edition!

I had the idea to fill this National Geographic questionnaire out from fellow TAPIF blogger Hardly Snarky, who wrote about her city of Aix-en Provence. I have been working on mine for the past few weeks, and am posting it today: 6 months to the day since arriving in Chambé!! I heart Chambéry because it seems to have a dash of something for all tastes: endless outdoor activities in the surrounding mountain ranges and lakes, great local wines and cheeses, a small but fervid arts scene. It actually reminds me a lot of a previous hometown, Charlottesville, Virginia: a sleepy college town surrounded my mountains, which was at one time home to a great philosopher whom the inhabitants still obsess over today… Throw in perfect baguettes and easy train access to some of Europe’s most vibrant cities and voilà! As a native of Washington, DC with no great athletic abilities or aspirations, I never thought I would grow such an affinity for mountains, but I’ll admit, the natural beauty of Chambéry has swayed me. At least …

Benvenuti in Italia

As brilliantly put by my good friend Julia: “Useful Italian words known: 0 Italian swearwords known: 6788984765658 Hello Turin!” The pack of Italian friends I have made here are very enthusiastic about teaching me Italian words, and I am more than happy to learn them. I have learned about 15 ways to use the word cazzo (Italian for dick, which is used in at least 50 expressions, to convey any emotion under the sun. I have learned how to say that something is disgusting, in a way that literally means, “it makes me shit” (or the even more vulgar “it makes me shit a dick”. Just one example of the many uses of cazzo!). And there’s the old standby I learned from my dad: Andiamo?! Unfortunately, very few of these phrases came in handy during our recent trip to Torino, Italy. Being the brilliant planner that I am,  I managed to make a slew of Italian friends and then leave them all behind in France while I travelled to Italy with three anglophones who speak even less Italian than …

Commence le Stage!

Yep, I did it! I officially started my job. As an intern at an art gallery. In Paris. IN FRENCH. I had basically no idea what to expect at first, despite having been to the gallery already to meet Charlotte (my maître de stage) already for my interview. Turns out, they’re in the middle of taking down the current exhibition (called an exPOsition in French…gets confusing) and putting up a new one that opens on Wednesday, June 5! I spent a lot of this day following around Charlotte and Emmanuelle, trying to understand what they were saying, mostly communicating through awkward sign language.

Birthday Weekend!

Moving right along to last weekend!!! Saturday was the birthday of one of my good friends in the program: LANA!!! We planned a day of picnic-ing (or as the French say: faire un pique-nique) in the park that happens to be just behind the apartment Steph and I live in: Parc André Citroën. Yep, like the car. Evidently, this park was built on the former site of a car factory. We wanted to go because during dinner one night, our host family told us that there’s a giant hot air balloon that you go up in! Obviously that needed to happen. So, a group met Steph and I outside our apartment and we left in search of lunch and the park! Along the way, we discovered a bunch of small grocery stores, shops, boulangeries within a 4 minute walk…aka things we should probably know exist so close to us. The park is really funky and modern–sort of like a post-modern version of the traditional French Le Nôtre style garden. There seemed to be a TON …