All posts filed under: Anne At Home

before that…

I crunched another tortilla chip as I watched the sun set from my parents’ rooftop patio. Before that, I lugged three floor pillows to the top floor to make myself a cozy reading spot in the dying sunlight. Before that, I sat down at my dining room table, texting my friend, noticing the birds and squirrels playing in our yard beyond the glass doors. Before that, I walked with my mom to the car, pulling off my sweatshirt in the unexpected heat. Before that, I promised the janitor who wanted to lock up the building that we would be out in just 10 more minutes! Before that, I scrolled through my playlists on Spotify, looking for some fun background music. Before that, I decided on the Stracciatella, instead of the chocolate gelato. Before that, I snapped a picture of a funny sign from the Italian deli to send to my friends who live in Italy. Before that, I overheard my mom and her friend discuss work and blogging (and heard my name pop up a few times….!) from downstairs. Before …

put down your phone

Working in a district that has a 1-to-1 technology initiative (all students 2nd-12th grade are given devices by the county), I am constantly wondering about the best ways to get children to use this technology responsibly. One major concern — which is often used in arguments against 1-to-1 technology programs — is that putting these devices into kids’ hands turns them into easily distractible zombies who are addicted to video games and don’t collaborate or talk to their friends anymore, consumed by their screens. I think there are a lot of things wrong with that assumption to start with (that is a post for another day…), but I also think that it then falls to us to model responsible use and to set limits on when devices should and should not be used. Some teachers I’ve spoken to have a policy that the technology should be used to create, not only to consume. I think this is a wonderful place to start! When I see kids in the halls playing mindless online games on their iPads, I usually ask …

currently

Currently: Perusing photographs from the past 5 years to relive and remember (and seek possible inspiration!) Responding to Laura’s texts about nothing in particular Searching for tomorrow’s Metro schedule, even though I’d hardly consider it reliable Listening to Dad’s shouts of frustration at the March Madness game on TV Checking Twitter for any possible distraction from finishing this post Jotting quick responses to two emails that probably could have waited until tomorrow Reflecting on how to balance multiple passions that are each all-consuming… Plotting where they will take me next Reading countless articles and thinkpieces about the election which make me want to bury my head in the sand Sending positive vibes into the universe Considering calling sick into work tomorrow…if only Anticipating a long week of relaxation, reading Sipping –does ice cream count?! Playing movies in my mind Pushing my brain into gear for 10 more minutes…10 more minutes…. What are you doing, currently? ❂ Thanks, Fran McVeigh for the inspiration!   Slice of Life is a daily writing challenge during the month of March hosted by Two Writing Teachers. Visit their blog for more information about the challenge and for advice and ideas about …

know it all

I have been working as a school-based substitute teacher at Discovery Elementary since October. My position is slightly unique, because while I am a substitute teacher, instead of getting a 6:00AM wake-up call, my assignment every day is to arrive at the same school and fill in the gaps. Sometimes subs don’t show up, teachers call in sick at the last minute, or need to go home early. Other days someone needs to be on coverage for teacher’s who must attend hour-long SPED/IEP/504/whatever other acronym meetings. Some days everything is covered and I spend the day in the library or monitoring recess. As frustrating as that may sound to some, I love this job. Those who have subbed before know how enormous of a difference it makes when kids recognize you, and especially when you already know their names. Learning the ropes, knowing how to navigate the building, being clued into which attention-grabbers each class uses, figuring out how to make the SMART board work or what kids are allowed to use their iPads for are all …

theatre disaster

This morning, a comment from yesterday’s post reminded me of one of my favorite songs from the Gershwin opera Porgy and Bess. So naturally, I turned on the soundtrack and played it on repeat for most of the morning. Then, I started sifting through some of my post-it notes for an idea of what to write about today and found: It’s referring to a concert I went to at Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts to see possibly my  favorite performer of all time Audra McDonald. Some of you might know her from the TV show Private Practice, the 1999 movie version of Annie (she played Grace, Mr. Warbucks’s assistant), or Mother Abbess from the NBC Sound of Music Live! program a few years ago. She also regularly sings Yahoo! Answers with Jimmy Fallon on The Tonight Show! But I am much more familiar with her Broadway credits as Sarah from Ragtime, Lizzie from 110 in the Shade, and Bess from the recent revival of Porgy and Bess. Simply put, she is an astounding person …

keys. wallet. phone. ✓

Looking through some of the memories from my jar, I found at least 3 that referenced getting locked out of my apartment. I suspect there are probably more, and that doesn’t even include the times I was locked out BEFORE starting to keep these notes, including locking myself out in the very first hour after moving into said apartment… I think my problem is because I’ve never really had to keep track of keys. When we moved to Arlington when I was 6, the house was already old. By the time I was coming and going on my own, the door had long been broken and no longer locked on its own. We never bothered to repair it or to make copies of the key to the deadbolt. In college, I only needed my ID to swipe into my building. I could have locked the door to my dorm room, but I was at the top of three or four flights of stairs, so I was never really nervous about potential thieves. Plus, the only thing …